Signage made easy with Snap and Fix

A new product launched by Eurobond Adhesives has been designed to make attaching signage to surfaces, either on a temporary or permanent basis, much easier.

Snap and Fix can be used with a range of different materials to attach two items together. The product uses a system of mushroom heads that interlock with one another. This creates a secure connection when the two sides are pushed together. One of the main benefits of the Snap and Fix system is that it can be used again and again without impacting on the strength of the connection. The heads can be unfastened and then reattached as and when required, both crossways and lengthways.

The product has an acrylic self-adhesive back that is pressure sensitive, making it quick and easy to attach or remove. It can be used to mount signage to walls and other hard surfaces. It works with a number of different types of signage, without having an impact on the quality of the design.

Here at The Sussex Sign Company we are constantly looking at new products on the market. This enables us to come up with the most appropriate signage solutions for our customers.

SignClip sees increase in sales

SignClip, the fixing solution for temporary signage, has seen a significant increase in sales since it was first launched almost two years ago. The company behind the innovative product will now have the ability to increase production speeds, which will reduce the overall cost to their customers.

SignClip was manufactured specifically for use with temporary signs, which had previously been difficult to attach to poles and railings. The only other viable alternative was the use of cable-ties, which were not ideal. The clip is used to attach signs produced from corrugated plastic, making them much easier to put up and take down.

The product was first shown to the market at the Sign and Digital UK event in 2012 and, since then, it has gone from strength to strength. The company is looking to increase its reach further, showcasing it as the perfect choice for customers and sign-makers involved in the temporary or disposable signage market. As sales continue to increase, the company aims to keep unit prices as low as they can.

Here at Sussex SignsThe Sussex Sign Company, we can produce a wide range of different signage options for our customers. We can work around your individual requirements, to create a style and design that?s just right.

New concept in LED Lighting

Wandlite have launched a new LED light model, which has the ability to offer 360 degree tube lighting. The product is waterproof, durable and long lasting.

In the past, there has been a tendency for LED manufacturers to focus on the capabilities of the light, rather than the design elements. However, with the new Wandlite, it remains visually attractive as well as practical. The LED tape has been spiral wound along the tube to better direct the light.

This new LED light is extremely energy efficient. It uses 12v or power, but only takes up 1.2 amps of energy per metre. It can be used where there is no direct electrical supply, including outdoor and temporary settings. In these cases, the light can be used with a rechargeable battery, solar panel, car battery or cigarette lighter.

The Wandlite is available in a range of lengths, from 800mm to 2000mm. They can be used to independently or a number of tubes can be connected together to create a longer length. It can also be produced in a range of colours to meet customer needs.

Here at The Sussex Sign Company we can offer a range of illuminated signs to suit the requirements of our customers.

Advertising Signage: Less Pro, More Professional

A councillor in East Devon has challenged the local business community in Honiton to alter the character and appearance of advertising signs in the area. Councillor John O’Leary drew attention to a number of signs that greet shoppers entering Lace Walk Shopping Centre.

The councillor said: “We need to work more closely with businesses on what is acceptable and not acceptable. Some of the signs are terrible. Lace Walk looks like a brothel entrance.”

Councillor O’Leary suggested that the unsightly signage may be a consequence of the type of buildings in the area.

He added: “Because it [Lace Walk Shopping Centre] is not a listed building, they [the owners] can do what they like. We have got to do something to help businesses in Honiton. Businesses are closing and what we are going to be left with is charity shops, coffee shops and betting shops.”

The district councillor for East Devon did not clarify why he expected betting, coffee and charity shops to survive the crisis.

Here at The Sussex Sign Company, we agree that inappropriate signage is a problem in many parts of the UK. Whether businesses close as a result of unsuitable signage is questionable, however. We always make an effort to create signs that are both tasteful and eye-catching”.

Fewer Road Signs – Tavistock Says Yes!

Following a public consultation, Devon County Council has agreed to reduce the number of road signs in Tavistock. The county council is expected to remove more than 50 road signs in the area.

The decision was made after a proposal to remove ‘repetitive’ road signs was endorsed by members of the public in Tavistock.

Councillor Debo Sellis, said: “We want to make the most of the town’s World Heritage Site status and this will start with the removal of signs to de-clutter the town centre.”

Ms Sellis noted that many signs in Tavistock were redundant. Citing one example, the councillor described how five signs spaced 180 metres apart indicated the presence of a roundabout.

According to Devon County Council, the response from the public consultation was definitive: 94 per cent of respondents were in favour of plans to remove unnecessary road signs from the streets of Tavistock.

Here at The Sussex Sign Company, we believe that less can be more. Excessive use of signage can be counter-productive, as motorists, pedestrians and shoppers tend to ignore repetitive signs. We make signs that stand out. Signs that convey a clear, concise message in a way that is easy to understand and notice at the first attempt”.

Council Reminds Businesses of Duty to Display Anti-Smoking Signage

Haringey Council has written to a number of businesses in the borough to remind them of their legal obligations under the Health Act 2006. The council is concerned that some companies in the area are failing in their duty to install anti-smoking signs on their premises.

Under the 2006 Act, every company in England and Wales is required to install a smoke-free sign at the entrance to its property. One of the main reasons for this is that workers are encouraged to defend their rights in the workplace.

Councillor Nilgun Canver said: “These signs are there to protect employees who want to work in a smoke-free environment. If signs are not displayed, employees can feel obliged to accept people smoking to avoid being accused of making a fuss.”

The cabinet member added: “The legislation is quite clear: working in a smoke-free environment is a legal right, not a privilege, whatever the size of the business.”

Businesses risk incurring a 200 Fixed Penalty Notice for failing to display the sign.

Here at The Sussex Sign Company, we produce all kinds of signage for use in the workplace, including anti-smoking signs that comply with government regulations.

Motorists Confused by Basic Road Signage

The survey challenged 2,000 motorists to name or describe road signs. Twenty per cent of respondents failed to recognise the sign for the national speed limit, while 36 per cent could not identify the sign for no stopping.

Forty per cent of surveyed motorists did not know the sign for no motor vehicles (34 per cent assumed it excludes everything except motor vehicles).

The Co-operative’s Amy Kilmartin, said: “Most people think they drive better than other motorists, despite admitting to getting distracted behind the wheel, as well as not knowing what some of the most common road signs mean.”

Of course, not all signs are easy to understand. In Stoney Stanton, Leicestershire, motorists were no doubt alarmed by the appearance of a double-humped camel, or at least a depiction thereof, on a “Humps for 700 yards” sign. Similar changes have been made to road signs in other parts of the country and across Europe, but those responsible should not expect drivers to take much notice.

Here at The Sussex Sign Company, we always aim to produce signage that is easy to read and simple to recognise.

The Cost of Removing ‘Unnecessary’ Road Signs

Reports claim a council in England has reserved £40,000 to spend on removing superfluous road signs.

Derbyshire County Council intends to follow the government’s advice by liberating Derby from signage clutter. Unfortunately, the cost of achieving this goal in the Dales alone has been estimated at £40,000.

Last year, the British Government advised local authorities to remove unnecessary signs from the roadside. According to ministers, excessive road signs cause all manner of problems in the UK. Aside from distracting or confusing motorists, they challenge the character and aesthetic appeal of cities, towns and villages. The government won public favour when it pledged to remove signage clutter, but does such a step correlate with the cost-saving mindset of the Coalition?

Across the whole of Derbyshire, £70,000 has been set aside to remove unnecessary road signs. Labour has argued that local authorities ought to be spending their limited funds more wisely, perhaps by fixing potholes in the area.

Simon Spencer, deputy leader of Derbyshire County Council and cabinet member for highways and transport, argued that the real waste comes in testing and maintaining unnecessary signs.

Here at The Sussex Sign Company, we support the removal of truly unnecessary signs, but only if the expense can be justified.

Farmer Vents Frustration Over Signage Ruling

A farmer in Lathom, Lancashire, has spoken out after planning officials rejected an appeal to install advertising signs on a stretch of Green Belt land.

Roger Webster erected three signs on private land near Hall Lane in Lathom. Each sign was affixed to a five-metre-high poll and advertised his retail business, Taylors Farm Shop. Mr Webster received a letter from the council informing him that the signs had to be removed because planning permission had not been granted. The farmer and shop owner subsequently applied for planning permission, but his application was rejected.

Planning officials cited the “excessive number, height and design” of the signs, which were deemed to have a “negative impact upon the visual appearance of this part of the Green Belt.”

Arguing that every business ought to have the right to advertise its services on private land, Mr Webster appealed the decision, but the council refused to change its position.

Mr Webster said: “I just think it’s a bit of a joke. There have been complaints about the garage too, but the council have decided their signs are OK.”

Here at The Sussex Sign Company, we sympathise with Mr Webster. Advertising is necessary for all businesses and roadside signage provides an effective means of communicating with potential customers.

NovaDura Tackles Vandalism

NovaDura has developed a new system of signwriting that aims to reduce the impact of vandalism.

The system incorporates a number of materials and methods to produce signage that is more resistant to graffiti. Though signs can still be vandalised in various ways, the new system should ensure that most types of graffiti can be safely removed from signage, without causing additional damage.

NovaDura developed the technology using pre-treated aluminium sheets and direct-to-substrate printing. Special inks ensure a professional finish, while a durable coating is applied to the sign to protect it from ultraviolet interference. When finished, the signs should be resistant to most kinds of graffiti.

Vandalism has plagued signage firms, local businesses and communities for decades. On Friday, street signs, bus stops and other such notices were targeted by vandals in Exmouth.

Speaking to local reporters, PCSO, Ben Tithecott, said: “We have received reports of extensive graffiti, predominantly along Salterton Road, Exmouth and Dinan Way. Some of it has been of an offensive nature.”

The PCSO added that police are working with East Devon District Council to resolve the problem.

Here at The Sussex Sign Company, we welcome the new system developed by NovaDura. Anti-graffiti signage should be considered by all those who want to minimise their exposure to vandalism.